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Scenic
Mountain
Seaside
Twisted
Straight
Duration:
5h 29 min
Distance:
201 mile
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Website:
http://www.causewaycoastandglens.com/portals/2/downloads/ccg_map.pdf

Experience the Causeway Coastal Route, one of the World’s Great Road Journeys.

The Causeway Coastal Route from Belfast Lough to Lough Foyle is a kaleidoscope journey of natural wonders, a unique blend of majesty and outstanding beauty.

Important notice: If you come from the continent you can fly to Belfast and hire a bike.
You can download the tour from Belfast Airport to bike rental on this tour here:
www.tourstart.org/tour/Belfast_Airport_to_motorcycle_rental_8162

To travel along the Causeway Coastal Route is to experience one of the most dramatic drives in the world. It is now rated as one of the World’s Great Road Journeys. Some 120 miles of stunning coastline will transport you past rugged and windswept cliffs, spectacular scenery and fabulous unspoilt beaches. It’s a coastline sprinkled with
historic castles, churches and forts. Many are now just ruins but each holds the memories of a mysterious and heroic past.

It’s a journey not to be hurried. Every twist and turn in the road will reveal new sights. On goes the road over bridges and under arches, past bays and beaches and strange rock formations. Travel inland and experience hills and valleys, dramatic scenery
and historic sites steeped in myths and legends. The Causeway Coastal Route provides a journey of exploration, where imagination meets reality and where every village and town, castle and rocky shore are waiting to be discovered.











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Causeway Costal Road

Experience the Causeway Coastal Route, one of the World’s Great Road Journeys.

The Causeway Coastal Route from Belfast Lough to Lough Foyle is a kaleidoscope journey of natural wonders, a unique blend of majesty and outstanding beauty.

Important notice: If you come from the continent you can fly to Belfast and hire a bike.
You can download the tour from Belfast Airport to bike rental on this tour here:
www.tourstart.org/tour/Belfast_Airport_to_motorcycle_rental_8162

To travel along the Causeway Coastal Route is to experience one of the most dramatic drives in the world. It is now rated as one of the World’s Great Road Journeys. Some 120 miles of stunning coastline will transport you past rugged and windswept cliffs, spectacular scenery and fabulous unspoilt beaches. It’s a coastline sprinkled with
historic castles, churches and forts. Many are now just ruins but each holds the memories of a mysterious and heroic past.

It’s a journey not to be hurried. Every twist and turn in the road will reveal new sights. On goes the road over bridges and under arches, past bays and beaches and strange rock formations. Travel inland and experience hills and valleys, dramatic scenery
and historic sites steeped in myths and legends. The Causeway Coastal Route provides a journey of exploration, where imagination meets reality and where every village and town, castle and rocky shore are waiting to be discovered.











Belfast City Hall

Belfast City Hall in the center of Belfast
http://www.belfastcity.gov.uk/cityhall/
Pictures
Videos

Whitehead

Whitehead is a small seaside town on the east coast of County Antrim, Northern Ireland, lying almost midway between the towns of Carrickfergus and Larne. It lies within the civil parishes of Island Magee and Templecorran, the barony of Belfast Lower, and is part of Carrickfergus Borough Council. Before the Plantation of Ulster its name was recorded as both Whitehead and Kinbaine (from Irish: an Cionn Bán meaning "the white head").[1]

Located at the base of Muldersleigh Hill, at the entrance to Belfast Lough, Whitehead lies in a small bay between the limestone cliffs of Whitehead and the black volcanic cliff of Blackhead, with the Blackhead Lighthouse on top, marking the entrance to the Lough. It had a population of 3,702 in the 2001 Census. Whitehead is unique in that there are no streets with the suffix "Street" in their name, giving rise to the nickname 'The Town With No Streets'.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitehead,_County_Antrim
Pictures

Larne Harbour

Larne Borough Council is a Local Council in County Antrim in Northern Ireland. Its headquarters is in the town of Larne and the population of the area is 32,180 according to the 2011 census. Larne is one of the most modern roll on-roll off ferry ports in the United Kingdom with a busy passenger traffic with Scotland
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Larne_Borough_Council
Pictures

Cushendall

Cushendall (from Irish: Cois Abhann Dalla meaning "foot of the River Dall"), formerly known as Newtown Glens,[1] is a village and townland in County Antrim, Northern Ireland.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cushendall
Pictures

Ballycastle

Ballycastle (from Irish: Baile an Chaistil, meaning "town of the castle") is a small town in County Antrim in Northern Ireland. Its population was 5,089 people in the 2001 Census. It is the seat and main settlement of Moyle District Council. The town has a beach, and views across to Rathlin Island and the Mull of Kintyre in Scotland. The town is at the northern mainland limit of the Antrim Coast and Glens Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Ballycastle is also famous for its Lammas Fair, which is held every year on the last Monday and Tuesday of August. Ballycastle is the home of the Corrymeela Community. The town forms part of the North Antrim constituency and the elected MP is Ian Paisley Jr.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ballycastle,_County_Antrim
Pictures

Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge

A short coastal footpath leads to Carrick-a-Rede Rope Bridge. On the way, there are wonderful vantage points to stop and take in the natural beauty. The geology, flora and fauna have won Carrick-a-Rede recognition as an area of special scientific interest. Fulmars, kittywakes, guillemots and razorbills breed on the islands close to the rope bridge. Of course, Carrick-a-Rede also boasts an exhilarating rope bridge experience. Traditionally fishermen erected the bridge to Carrick-a-Rede island over a 23m-deep and 20m-wide chasm to check their salmon nets. Today visitors are drawn here simply to take the rope bridge challenge! The rope bridge originally consisted of a single rope hand rail which has been replaced by a two hand railed bridge by the National Trust. Sheep Island View Hosteldisplay a collection of old photographs of people doing stunts on the bridge. Once you reach Carrick Island, the reward is seeing the diverse birdlife and an uninterrupted view across to Rathlin Island and Scotland. There is only one way off the island - back across the swinging bridge! Don't look down! The area is exceptional in is natural beauty, to the left as you come down the steep hill is Larrybane headland which once stretched out towards Sheep Island and had a promontory fort on the top dating to 800AD, underneath large caves once served as home to boat builders and a safe resting place from winter storms. Despite having been quarried in the 1950's this quarry is still worth a visit for its exceptional views. • One of Northern Ireland's best-loved attractions • Rocky island connected to the cliffs by a rope bridge • Exhilarating coastal path experience • Stunning views of Rathlin and Scottish islands • Site of Special Scientific Interest: unique geology, flora and fauna • Fantastic bird-watching • Children's discovery trail for 8 -14 year olds • Guided tours by arrangement for groups of 15+ people • Viewing platform suitable for visitors with disabilities • Dogs not permitted to cross bridge
http://www.causewaycoastandglens.com/P2829-Carrick-a-Rede-Rope-Bridge-Antrim-Northern-Ireland-Ballintoy-Ballycastle.aspx

Giants Causeway

The Giant's Causeway (known as Clochán an Aifir or Clochán na bhFomhórach in Irish and tha Giant's Causey in Ulster-Scots) is an area of about 40,000 interlocking basalt columns, the result of an ancient volcanic eruption. It is located in County Antrim on the northeast coast of Northern Ireland, about three miles (4.8 km) northeast of the town of Bushmills. It was declared a World Heritage Site by UNESCO in 1986, and a National Nature Reserve in 1987 by the Department of the Environment for Northern Ireland. In a 2005 poll of Radio Times readers, the Giant's Causeway was named as the fourth greatest natural wonder in the United Kingdom. The tops of the columns form stepping stones that lead from the cliff foot and disappear under the sea. Most of the columns are hexagonal, although there are also some with four, five, seven or eight sides. The tallest are about 12 metres (39 ft) high, and the solidified lava in the cliffs is 28 metres thick in places. The Giant's Causeway is today owned and managed by the National Trust and it is the most popular tourist attraction in Northern Ireland.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant's_Causeway
Pictures
Videos

Old Bushmills Destillery

The Old Bushmills Distillery is a distillery in Bushmills, County Antrim, Northern Ireland. It is owned and operated by Diageo plc, and is a popular tourist attraction, with around 120,000 visitors per year. According to the company, a distillery by this name was first recorded in 1743, although at the time it was "in the hands of smugglers" (in a quote attributed to Victorian whiskey journalist Alfred Barnard).

All of the whiskey bottled under the Bushmills whiskey brand is produced at the Bushmills Distillery. A licence to distill in the area was granted to Sir Thomas Phillipps in 1608 by King James I, and the 1608 date is printed on the labels of the Bushmills brand whiskey.

The Bushmills Distillery claims to be—and is almost unanimously considered to be—the oldest licensed distillery in the world.[
http://www.bushmills.com/
Pictures

Dunluce Castle

Dunluce Castle (from Irish: Dún Libhse) is a now-ruined medieval castle in Northern Ireland. It is located on the edge of a basalt outcropping in County Antrim (between Portballintrae and Portrush), and is accessible via a bridge connecting it to the mainland. The castle is surrounded by extremely steep drops on either side, which may have been an important factor to the early Christians and Vikings who were drawn to this place where an early Irish fort once stood.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dunluce_Castle
Pictures

Portrush Harbour, Portrush, United Kingdom

Portrush (from Irish: Port Rois, meaning "promontory port") is a small seaside resort town in County Antrim, Northern Ireland, on the County Londonderry border. The main part of the old town, including the railway station as well as most hotels, restaurants and bars, is built on a mile–long peninsula, Ramore Head, pointing north-northwest. It had a population of 6,372 people as measured by the 2001 Census. In the off-season, Portrush is a dormitory town for the nearby campus of the University of Ulster at Coleraine. It neighbours the resort of Portstewart.

The town is well known for its three sandy beaches, the West Strand, East Strand and White Rocks, as well as the Royal Portrush Golf Club, the only golf club outside of mainland Great Britain which has hosted the Open Championship.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Portrush
Pictures

Coleraine

Have a look at the townhall
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coleraine
Pictures

Downhill, United Kingdom

Limavady

Limavady (pron.: /lɪməˈvædi/; from Irish: Léim a' Mhadaidh meaning "leap of the dog") is a market town in County Londonderry, Northern Ireland, with Binevenagh as a backdrop. It lies 17 miles (27 km) east of Derry and 14 miles (23 km) south west of Coleraine. It had a population of 12,135 people in the 2001 Census, an increase of some 17% compared to 1991. In the 30 years after 1971 Limavady’s population almost doubled.[
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Limavady
Pictures

Londonderry

Derry or Londonderry is the second-largest city in Northern Ireland and the fourth-largest city on the island of Ireland. The name Derry is an anglicisation of the Irish name Daire or Doire meaning "oak grove". In 1613, the city was granted a Royal Charter by King James I and the "London" prefix was added, changing the name of the city to Londonderry. While the city is more usually known as Derry, Londonderry is also used and remains the legal name.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Derry
Pictures

Belfast, United Kingdom

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